On set at Abbey Road Studio 2 directing a live session with Kill It Kid.
ZoomInfo
Camera



ISO

3200

Aperture

f/3.5

Exposure

1/160th

Focal Length

24mm

On set at Abbey Road Studio 2 directing a live session with Kill It Kid.

The front cover of my next release which heads out all over the world very soon. If you pre-ordered it then you’re in for a surprise in the post at some point in the near future!

Behind the scenes on the ‘Tragic Thrill’ shoot for Foxy Shazam
Foxy Shazam; they’re a band I ended up working alongside about 4 years ago in London. Ever since the moment we met we were creatively connected and this has lead to us taking a journey to try and make as many amazing visuals as possible. This time I flew out to America (back in February) to direct the debut video for their new album Gonzo and it was one of the most rewarding directing experiences in my career to date. 
It’s always a strange thing to think about the progression of your career as a director, and you wonder when and how the day will come where you are on a professional set controlling/collaborating with other people; crafting your vision. I think I realised this half way through this shoot. I’ve done large scale shoots before so it wasn’t a new thing to me, but there was something special about this instance as I felt truly 100% at home. Have you ever encountered something in life which you sit into so easily? It’s like walking or drinking or something else which you do naturally. Without being cheesy this was one of those days and together we all came together to make a vision worthy of ‘Gonzo’. 
Working with Foxy is something which takes a certain level of subconscious understanding. Eric steers a lot of the visual direction and he has a lot of specifics which he requires to craft how the band looks and feels. He’s not comfortable to move forward on an idea unless he understands it. I’ve learned over time the best way to communicate our ideas productively and this has strengthened our working relationship. It’s a privilege therefore that he lets me take control of their videos (this is something that doesn’t normally happen on other aspects of the band). We’d had a number of short productions meetings before hand discussing our shots, concepts and themes, but with our projects a lot of the creative input comes during the shoot itself. This is part of the chemical equation and helps us create the themes and styles that many of our projects have showcased. 
I relished working with the team of guys at midwest studios in Cincinnati who were able to grasp the things I wanted but also provide some really valid feedback. One thing I value more than anything from my crew is constructive feedback and input at the right moments. Our cinematographer Eric was on point and together we were able to expand on the shots the concept required. There were some specifics like a high angle jib shot which lowered into the drums while spinning, and also the fast jib arm movement from Sky’s platform over to Aaron’s drum riser etc etc (I won’t do the huge list). But from the word go both him and our lighting gaffer were without complaint looking for the right solutions in terms of lighting aesthetics and grip equipment. Their hard work ethics stayed with them right up until we wrapped (I believe that is one of the best selling points you can have in this industry next to reliability).
Although this was a performance shoot there were many specific angles we wanted which made it ‘not your average shoot’. This ranged from strange green screen cut aways to wide shots that lingered uncomfortably for far too long. Foxy are a band that want to do performance videos primarily over anything else as that is very much in their make up. Their performance is part of the overall band personality so this was our starting angle before we’d even hit the studio. Please check out some of the photos above and if you have any specific questions please drop them into my inbox.
Rx
ZoomInfo
Behind the scenes on the ‘Tragic Thrill’ shoot for Foxy Shazam
Foxy Shazam; they’re a band I ended up working alongside about 4 years ago in London. Ever since the moment we met we were creatively connected and this has lead to us taking a journey to try and make as many amazing visuals as possible. This time I flew out to America (back in February) to direct the debut video for their new album Gonzo and it was one of the most rewarding directing experiences in my career to date. 
It’s always a strange thing to think about the progression of your career as a director, and you wonder when and how the day will come where you are on a professional set controlling/collaborating with other people; crafting your vision. I think I realised this half way through this shoot. I’ve done large scale shoots before so it wasn’t a new thing to me, but there was something special about this instance as I felt truly 100% at home. Have you ever encountered something in life which you sit into so easily? It’s like walking or drinking or something else which you do naturally. Without being cheesy this was one of those days and together we all came together to make a vision worthy of ‘Gonzo’. 
Working with Foxy is something which takes a certain level of subconscious understanding. Eric steers a lot of the visual direction and he has a lot of specifics which he requires to craft how the band looks and feels. He’s not comfortable to move forward on an idea unless he understands it. I’ve learned over time the best way to communicate our ideas productively and this has strengthened our working relationship. It’s a privilege therefore that he lets me take control of their videos (this is something that doesn’t normally happen on other aspects of the band). We’d had a number of short productions meetings before hand discussing our shots, concepts and themes, but with our projects a lot of the creative input comes during the shoot itself. This is part of the chemical equation and helps us create the themes and styles that many of our projects have showcased. 
I relished working with the team of guys at midwest studios in Cincinnati who were able to grasp the things I wanted but also provide some really valid feedback. One thing I value more than anything from my crew is constructive feedback and input at the right moments. Our cinematographer Eric was on point and together we were able to expand on the shots the concept required. There were some specifics like a high angle jib shot which lowered into the drums while spinning, and also the fast jib arm movement from Sky’s platform over to Aaron’s drum riser etc etc (I won’t do the huge list). But from the word go both him and our lighting gaffer were without complaint looking for the right solutions in terms of lighting aesthetics and grip equipment. Their hard work ethics stayed with them right up until we wrapped (I believe that is one of the best selling points you can have in this industry next to reliability).
Although this was a performance shoot there were many specific angles we wanted which made it ‘not your average shoot’. This ranged from strange green screen cut aways to wide shots that lingered uncomfortably for far too long. Foxy are a band that want to do performance videos primarily over anything else as that is very much in their make up. Their performance is part of the overall band personality so this was our starting angle before we’d even hit the studio. Please check out some of the photos above and if you have any specific questions please drop them into my inbox.
Rx
ZoomInfo
Behind the scenes on the ‘Tragic Thrill’ shoot for Foxy Shazam
Foxy Shazam; they’re a band I ended up working alongside about 4 years ago in London. Ever since the moment we met we were creatively connected and this has lead to us taking a journey to try and make as many amazing visuals as possible. This time I flew out to America (back in February) to direct the debut video for their new album Gonzo and it was one of the most rewarding directing experiences in my career to date. 
It’s always a strange thing to think about the progression of your career as a director, and you wonder when and how the day will come where you are on a professional set controlling/collaborating with other people; crafting your vision. I think I realised this half way through this shoot. I’ve done large scale shoots before so it wasn’t a new thing to me, but there was something special about this instance as I felt truly 100% at home. Have you ever encountered something in life which you sit into so easily? It’s like walking or drinking or something else which you do naturally. Without being cheesy this was one of those days and together we all came together to make a vision worthy of ‘Gonzo’. 
Working with Foxy is something which takes a certain level of subconscious understanding. Eric steers a lot of the visual direction and he has a lot of specifics which he requires to craft how the band looks and feels. He’s not comfortable to move forward on an idea unless he understands it. I’ve learned over time the best way to communicate our ideas productively and this has strengthened our working relationship. It’s a privilege therefore that he lets me take control of their videos (this is something that doesn’t normally happen on other aspects of the band). We’d had a number of short productions meetings before hand discussing our shots, concepts and themes, but with our projects a lot of the creative input comes during the shoot itself. This is part of the chemical equation and helps us create the themes and styles that many of our projects have showcased. 
I relished working with the team of guys at midwest studios in Cincinnati who were able to grasp the things I wanted but also provide some really valid feedback. One thing I value more than anything from my crew is constructive feedback and input at the right moments. Our cinematographer Eric was on point and together we were able to expand on the shots the concept required. There were some specifics like a high angle jib shot which lowered into the drums while spinning, and also the fast jib arm movement from Sky’s platform over to Aaron’s drum riser etc etc (I won’t do the huge list). But from the word go both him and our lighting gaffer were without complaint looking for the right solutions in terms of lighting aesthetics and grip equipment. Their hard work ethics stayed with them right up until we wrapped (I believe that is one of the best selling points you can have in this industry next to reliability).
Although this was a performance shoot there were many specific angles we wanted which made it ‘not your average shoot’. This ranged from strange green screen cut aways to wide shots that lingered uncomfortably for far too long. Foxy are a band that want to do performance videos primarily over anything else as that is very much in their make up. Their performance is part of the overall band personality so this was our starting angle before we’d even hit the studio. Please check out some of the photos above and if you have any specific questions please drop them into my inbox.
Rx
ZoomInfo
Behind the scenes on the ‘Tragic Thrill’ shoot for Foxy Shazam
Foxy Shazam; they’re a band I ended up working alongside about 4 years ago in London. Ever since the moment we met we were creatively connected and this has lead to us taking a journey to try and make as many amazing visuals as possible. This time I flew out to America (back in February) to direct the debut video for their new album Gonzo and it was one of the most rewarding directing experiences in my career to date. 
It’s always a strange thing to think about the progression of your career as a director, and you wonder when and how the day will come where you are on a professional set controlling/collaborating with other people; crafting your vision. I think I realised this half way through this shoot. I’ve done large scale shoots before so it wasn’t a new thing to me, but there was something special about this instance as I felt truly 100% at home. Have you ever encountered something in life which you sit into so easily? It’s like walking or drinking or something else which you do naturally. Without being cheesy this was one of those days and together we all came together to make a vision worthy of ‘Gonzo’. 
Working with Foxy is something which takes a certain level of subconscious understanding. Eric steers a lot of the visual direction and he has a lot of specifics which he requires to craft how the band looks and feels. He’s not comfortable to move forward on an idea unless he understands it. I’ve learned over time the best way to communicate our ideas productively and this has strengthened our working relationship. It’s a privilege therefore that he lets me take control of their videos (this is something that doesn’t normally happen on other aspects of the band). We’d had a number of short productions meetings before hand discussing our shots, concepts and themes, but with our projects a lot of the creative input comes during the shoot itself. This is part of the chemical equation and helps us create the themes and styles that many of our projects have showcased. 
I relished working with the team of guys at midwest studios in Cincinnati who were able to grasp the things I wanted but also provide some really valid feedback. One thing I value more than anything from my crew is constructive feedback and input at the right moments. Our cinematographer Eric was on point and together we were able to expand on the shots the concept required. There were some specifics like a high angle jib shot which lowered into the drums while spinning, and also the fast jib arm movement from Sky’s platform over to Aaron’s drum riser etc etc (I won’t do the huge list). But from the word go both him and our lighting gaffer were without complaint looking for the right solutions in terms of lighting aesthetics and grip equipment. Their hard work ethics stayed with them right up until we wrapped (I believe that is one of the best selling points you can have in this industry next to reliability).
Although this was a performance shoot there were many specific angles we wanted which made it ‘not your average shoot’. This ranged from strange green screen cut aways to wide shots that lingered uncomfortably for far too long. Foxy are a band that want to do performance videos primarily over anything else as that is very much in their make up. Their performance is part of the overall band personality so this was our starting angle before we’d even hit the studio. Please check out some of the photos above and if you have any specific questions please drop them into my inbox.
Rx
ZoomInfo
Behind the scenes on the ‘Tragic Thrill’ shoot for Foxy Shazam
Foxy Shazam; they’re a band I ended up working alongside about 4 years ago in London. Ever since the moment we met we were creatively connected and this has lead to us taking a journey to try and make as many amazing visuals as possible. This time I flew out to America (back in February) to direct the debut video for their new album Gonzo and it was one of the most rewarding directing experiences in my career to date. 
It’s always a strange thing to think about the progression of your career as a director, and you wonder when and how the day will come where you are on a professional set controlling/collaborating with other people; crafting your vision. I think I realised this half way through this shoot. I’ve done large scale shoots before so it wasn’t a new thing to me, but there was something special about this instance as I felt truly 100% at home. Have you ever encountered something in life which you sit into so easily? It’s like walking or drinking or something else which you do naturally. Without being cheesy this was one of those days and together we all came together to make a vision worthy of ‘Gonzo’. 
Working with Foxy is something which takes a certain level of subconscious understanding. Eric steers a lot of the visual direction and he has a lot of specifics which he requires to craft how the band looks and feels. He’s not comfortable to move forward on an idea unless he understands it. I’ve learned over time the best way to communicate our ideas productively and this has strengthened our working relationship. It’s a privilege therefore that he lets me take control of their videos (this is something that doesn’t normally happen on other aspects of the band). We’d had a number of short productions meetings before hand discussing our shots, concepts and themes, but with our projects a lot of the creative input comes during the shoot itself. This is part of the chemical equation and helps us create the themes and styles that many of our projects have showcased. 
I relished working with the team of guys at midwest studios in Cincinnati who were able to grasp the things I wanted but also provide some really valid feedback. One thing I value more than anything from my crew is constructive feedback and input at the right moments. Our cinematographer Eric was on point and together we were able to expand on the shots the concept required. There were some specifics like a high angle jib shot which lowered into the drums while spinning, and also the fast jib arm movement from Sky’s platform over to Aaron’s drum riser etc etc (I won’t do the huge list). But from the word go both him and our lighting gaffer were without complaint looking for the right solutions in terms of lighting aesthetics and grip equipment. Their hard work ethics stayed with them right up until we wrapped (I believe that is one of the best selling points you can have in this industry next to reliability).
Although this was a performance shoot there were many specific angles we wanted which made it ‘not your average shoot’. This ranged from strange green screen cut aways to wide shots that lingered uncomfortably for far too long. Foxy are a band that want to do performance videos primarily over anything else as that is very much in their make up. Their performance is part of the overall band personality so this was our starting angle before we’d even hit the studio. Please check out some of the photos above and if you have any specific questions please drop them into my inbox.
Rx
ZoomInfo
Behind the scenes on the ‘Tragic Thrill’ shoot for Foxy Shazam
Foxy Shazam; they’re a band I ended up working alongside about 4 years ago in London. Ever since the moment we met we were creatively connected and this has lead to us taking a journey to try and make as many amazing visuals as possible. This time I flew out to America (back in February) to direct the debut video for their new album Gonzo and it was one of the most rewarding directing experiences in my career to date. 
It’s always a strange thing to think about the progression of your career as a director, and you wonder when and how the day will come where you are on a professional set controlling/collaborating with other people; crafting your vision. I think I realised this half way through this shoot. I’ve done large scale shoots before so it wasn’t a new thing to me, but there was something special about this instance as I felt truly 100% at home. Have you ever encountered something in life which you sit into so easily? It’s like walking or drinking or something else which you do naturally. Without being cheesy this was one of those days and together we all came together to make a vision worthy of ‘Gonzo’. 
Working with Foxy is something which takes a certain level of subconscious understanding. Eric steers a lot of the visual direction and he has a lot of specifics which he requires to craft how the band looks and feels. He’s not comfortable to move forward on an idea unless he understands it. I’ve learned over time the best way to communicate our ideas productively and this has strengthened our working relationship. It’s a privilege therefore that he lets me take control of their videos (this is something that doesn’t normally happen on other aspects of the band). We’d had a number of short productions meetings before hand discussing our shots, concepts and themes, but with our projects a lot of the creative input comes during the shoot itself. This is part of the chemical equation and helps us create the themes and styles that many of our projects have showcased. 
I relished working with the team of guys at midwest studios in Cincinnati who were able to grasp the things I wanted but also provide some really valid feedback. One thing I value more than anything from my crew is constructive feedback and input at the right moments. Our cinematographer Eric was on point and together we were able to expand on the shots the concept required. There were some specifics like a high angle jib shot which lowered into the drums while spinning, and also the fast jib arm movement from Sky’s platform over to Aaron’s drum riser etc etc (I won’t do the huge list). But from the word go both him and our lighting gaffer were without complaint looking for the right solutions in terms of lighting aesthetics and grip equipment. Their hard work ethics stayed with them right up until we wrapped (I believe that is one of the best selling points you can have in this industry next to reliability).
Although this was a performance shoot there were many specific angles we wanted which made it ‘not your average shoot’. This ranged from strange green screen cut aways to wide shots that lingered uncomfortably for far too long. Foxy are a band that want to do performance videos primarily over anything else as that is very much in their make up. Their performance is part of the overall band personality so this was our starting angle before we’d even hit the studio. Please check out some of the photos above and if you have any specific questions please drop them into my inbox.
Rx
ZoomInfo
Behind the scenes on the ‘Tragic Thrill’ shoot for Foxy Shazam
Foxy Shazam; they’re a band I ended up working alongside about 4 years ago in London. Ever since the moment we met we were creatively connected and this has lead to us taking a journey to try and make as many amazing visuals as possible. This time I flew out to America (back in February) to direct the debut video for their new album Gonzo and it was one of the most rewarding directing experiences in my career to date. 
It’s always a strange thing to think about the progression of your career as a director, and you wonder when and how the day will come where you are on a professional set controlling/collaborating with other people; crafting your vision. I think I realised this half way through this shoot. I’ve done large scale shoots before so it wasn’t a new thing to me, but there was something special about this instance as I felt truly 100% at home. Have you ever encountered something in life which you sit into so easily? It’s like walking or drinking or something else which you do naturally. Without being cheesy this was one of those days and together we all came together to make a vision worthy of ‘Gonzo’. 
Working with Foxy is something which takes a certain level of subconscious understanding. Eric steers a lot of the visual direction and he has a lot of specifics which he requires to craft how the band looks and feels. He’s not comfortable to move forward on an idea unless he understands it. I’ve learned over time the best way to communicate our ideas productively and this has strengthened our working relationship. It’s a privilege therefore that he lets me take control of their videos (this is something that doesn’t normally happen on other aspects of the band). We’d had a number of short productions meetings before hand discussing our shots, concepts and themes, but with our projects a lot of the creative input comes during the shoot itself. This is part of the chemical equation and helps us create the themes and styles that many of our projects have showcased. 
I relished working with the team of guys at midwest studios in Cincinnati who were able to grasp the things I wanted but also provide some really valid feedback. One thing I value more than anything from my crew is constructive feedback and input at the right moments. Our cinematographer Eric was on point and together we were able to expand on the shots the concept required. There were some specifics like a high angle jib shot which lowered into the drums while spinning, and also the fast jib arm movement from Sky’s platform over to Aaron’s drum riser etc etc (I won’t do the huge list). But from the word go both him and our lighting gaffer were without complaint looking for the right solutions in terms of lighting aesthetics and grip equipment. Their hard work ethics stayed with them right up until we wrapped (I believe that is one of the best selling points you can have in this industry next to reliability).
Although this was a performance shoot there were many specific angles we wanted which made it ‘not your average shoot’. This ranged from strange green screen cut aways to wide shots that lingered uncomfortably for far too long. Foxy are a band that want to do performance videos primarily over anything else as that is very much in their make up. Their performance is part of the overall band personality so this was our starting angle before we’d even hit the studio. Please check out some of the photos above and if you have any specific questions please drop them into my inbox.
Rx
ZoomInfo
Behind the scenes on the ‘Tragic Thrill’ shoot for Foxy Shazam
Foxy Shazam; they’re a band I ended up working alongside about 4 years ago in London. Ever since the moment we met we were creatively connected and this has lead to us taking a journey to try and make as many amazing visuals as possible. This time I flew out to America (back in February) to direct the debut video for their new album Gonzo and it was one of the most rewarding directing experiences in my career to date. 
It’s always a strange thing to think about the progression of your career as a director, and you wonder when and how the day will come where you are on a professional set controlling/collaborating with other people; crafting your vision. I think I realised this half way through this shoot. I’ve done large scale shoots before so it wasn’t a new thing to me, but there was something special about this instance as I felt truly 100% at home. Have you ever encountered something in life which you sit into so easily? It’s like walking or drinking or something else which you do naturally. Without being cheesy this was one of those days and together we all came together to make a vision worthy of ‘Gonzo’. 
Working with Foxy is something which takes a certain level of subconscious understanding. Eric steers a lot of the visual direction and he has a lot of specifics which he requires to craft how the band looks and feels. He’s not comfortable to move forward on an idea unless he understands it. I’ve learned over time the best way to communicate our ideas productively and this has strengthened our working relationship. It’s a privilege therefore that he lets me take control of their videos (this is something that doesn’t normally happen on other aspects of the band). We’d had a number of short productions meetings before hand discussing our shots, concepts and themes, but with our projects a lot of the creative input comes during the shoot itself. This is part of the chemical equation and helps us create the themes and styles that many of our projects have showcased. 
I relished working with the team of guys at midwest studios in Cincinnati who were able to grasp the things I wanted but also provide some really valid feedback. One thing I value more than anything from my crew is constructive feedback and input at the right moments. Our cinematographer Eric was on point and together we were able to expand on the shots the concept required. There were some specifics like a high angle jib shot which lowered into the drums while spinning, and also the fast jib arm movement from Sky’s platform over to Aaron’s drum riser etc etc (I won’t do the huge list). But from the word go both him and our lighting gaffer were without complaint looking for the right solutions in terms of lighting aesthetics and grip equipment. Their hard work ethics stayed with them right up until we wrapped (I believe that is one of the best selling points you can have in this industry next to reliability).
Although this was a performance shoot there were many specific angles we wanted which made it ‘not your average shoot’. This ranged from strange green screen cut aways to wide shots that lingered uncomfortably for far too long. Foxy are a band that want to do performance videos primarily over anything else as that is very much in their make up. Their performance is part of the overall band personality so this was our starting angle before we’d even hit the studio. Please check out some of the photos above and if you have any specific questions please drop them into my inbox.
Rx
ZoomInfo
Behind the scenes on the ‘Tragic Thrill’ shoot for Foxy Shazam
Foxy Shazam; they’re a band I ended up working alongside about 4 years ago in London. Ever since the moment we met we were creatively connected and this has lead to us taking a journey to try and make as many amazing visuals as possible. This time I flew out to America (back in February) to direct the debut video for their new album Gonzo and it was one of the most rewarding directing experiences in my career to date. 
It’s always a strange thing to think about the progression of your career as a director, and you wonder when and how the day will come where you are on a professional set controlling/collaborating with other people; crafting your vision. I think I realised this half way through this shoot. I’ve done large scale shoots before so it wasn’t a new thing to me, but there was something special about this instance as I felt truly 100% at home. Have you ever encountered something in life which you sit into so easily? It’s like walking or drinking or something else which you do naturally. Without being cheesy this was one of those days and together we all came together to make a vision worthy of ‘Gonzo’. 
Working with Foxy is something which takes a certain level of subconscious understanding. Eric steers a lot of the visual direction and he has a lot of specifics which he requires to craft how the band looks and feels. He’s not comfortable to move forward on an idea unless he understands it. I’ve learned over time the best way to communicate our ideas productively and this has strengthened our working relationship. It’s a privilege therefore that he lets me take control of their videos (this is something that doesn’t normally happen on other aspects of the band). We’d had a number of short productions meetings before hand discussing our shots, concepts and themes, but with our projects a lot of the creative input comes during the shoot itself. This is part of the chemical equation and helps us create the themes and styles that many of our projects have showcased. 
I relished working with the team of guys at midwest studios in Cincinnati who were able to grasp the things I wanted but also provide some really valid feedback. One thing I value more than anything from my crew is constructive feedback and input at the right moments. Our cinematographer Eric was on point and together we were able to expand on the shots the concept required. There were some specifics like a high angle jib shot which lowered into the drums while spinning, and also the fast jib arm movement from Sky’s platform over to Aaron’s drum riser etc etc (I won’t do the huge list). But from the word go both him and our lighting gaffer were without complaint looking for the right solutions in terms of lighting aesthetics and grip equipment. Their hard work ethics stayed with them right up until we wrapped (I believe that is one of the best selling points you can have in this industry next to reliability).
Although this was a performance shoot there were many specific angles we wanted which made it ‘not your average shoot’. This ranged from strange green screen cut aways to wide shots that lingered uncomfortably for far too long. Foxy are a band that want to do performance videos primarily over anything else as that is very much in their make up. Their performance is part of the overall band personality so this was our starting angle before we’d even hit the studio. Please check out some of the photos above and if you have any specific questions please drop them into my inbox.
Rx
ZoomInfo
Behind the scenes on the ‘Tragic Thrill’ shoot for Foxy Shazam
Foxy Shazam; they’re a band I ended up working alongside about 4 years ago in London. Ever since the moment we met we were creatively connected and this has lead to us taking a journey to try and make as many amazing visuals as possible. This time I flew out to America (back in February) to direct the debut video for their new album Gonzo and it was one of the most rewarding directing experiences in my career to date. 
It’s always a strange thing to think about the progression of your career as a director, and you wonder when and how the day will come where you are on a professional set controlling/collaborating with other people; crafting your vision. I think I realised this half way through this shoot. I’ve done large scale shoots before so it wasn’t a new thing to me, but there was something special about this instance as I felt truly 100% at home. Have you ever encountered something in life which you sit into so easily? It’s like walking or drinking or something else which you do naturally. Without being cheesy this was one of those days and together we all came together to make a vision worthy of ‘Gonzo’. 
Working with Foxy is something which takes a certain level of subconscious understanding. Eric steers a lot of the visual direction and he has a lot of specifics which he requires to craft how the band looks and feels. He’s not comfortable to move forward on an idea unless he understands it. I’ve learned over time the best way to communicate our ideas productively and this has strengthened our working relationship. It’s a privilege therefore that he lets me take control of their videos (this is something that doesn’t normally happen on other aspects of the band). We’d had a number of short productions meetings before hand discussing our shots, concepts and themes, but with our projects a lot of the creative input comes during the shoot itself. This is part of the chemical equation and helps us create the themes and styles that many of our projects have showcased. 
I relished working with the team of guys at midwest studios in Cincinnati who were able to grasp the things I wanted but also provide some really valid feedback. One thing I value more than anything from my crew is constructive feedback and input at the right moments. Our cinematographer Eric was on point and together we were able to expand on the shots the concept required. There were some specifics like a high angle jib shot which lowered into the drums while spinning, and also the fast jib arm movement from Sky’s platform over to Aaron’s drum riser etc etc (I won’t do the huge list). But from the word go both him and our lighting gaffer were without complaint looking for the right solutions in terms of lighting aesthetics and grip equipment. Their hard work ethics stayed with them right up until we wrapped (I believe that is one of the best selling points you can have in this industry next to reliability).
Although this was a performance shoot there were many specific angles we wanted which made it ‘not your average shoot’. This ranged from strange green screen cut aways to wide shots that lingered uncomfortably for far too long. Foxy are a band that want to do performance videos primarily over anything else as that is very much in their make up. Their performance is part of the overall band personality so this was our starting angle before we’d even hit the studio. Please check out some of the photos above and if you have any specific questions please drop them into my inbox.
Rx
ZoomInfo

Behind the scenes on the ‘Tragic Thrill’ shoot for Foxy Shazam

Foxy Shazam; they’re a band I ended up working alongside about 4 years ago in London. Ever since the moment we met we were creatively connected and this has lead to us taking a journey to try and make as many amazing visuals as possible. This time I flew out to America (back in February) to direct the debut video for their new album Gonzo and it was one of the most rewarding directing experiences in my career to date. 

It’s always a strange thing to think about the progression of your career as a director, and you wonder when and how the day will come where you are on a professional set controlling/collaborating with other people; crafting your vision. I think I realised this half way through this shoot. I’ve done large scale shoots before so it wasn’t a new thing to me, but there was something special about this instance as I felt truly 100% at home. Have you ever encountered something in life which you sit into so easily? It’s like walking or drinking or something else which you do naturally. Without being cheesy this was one of those days and together we all came together to make a vision worthy of ‘Gonzo’. 

Working with Foxy is something which takes a certain level of subconscious understanding. Eric steers a lot of the visual direction and he has a lot of specifics which he requires to craft how the band looks and feels. He’s not comfortable to move forward on an idea unless he understands it. I’ve learned over time the best way to communicate our ideas productively and this has strengthened our working relationship. It’s a privilege therefore that he lets me take control of their videos (this is something that doesn’t normally happen on other aspects of the band). We’d had a number of short productions meetings before hand discussing our shots, concepts and themes, but with our projects a lot of the creative input comes during the shoot itself. This is part of the chemical equation and helps us create the themes and styles that many of our projects have showcased. 

I relished working with the team of guys at midwest studios in Cincinnati who were able to grasp the things I wanted but also provide some really valid feedback. One thing I value more than anything from my crew is constructive feedback and input at the right moments. Our cinematographer Eric was on point and together we were able to expand on the shots the concept required. There were some specifics like a high angle jib shot which lowered into the drums while spinning, and also the fast jib arm movement from Sky’s platform over to Aaron’s drum riser etc etc (I won’t do the huge list). But from the word go both him and our lighting gaffer were without complaint looking for the right solutions in terms of lighting aesthetics and grip equipment. Their hard work ethics stayed with them right up until we wrapped (I believe that is one of the best selling points you can have in this industry next to reliability).

Although this was a performance shoot there were many specific angles we wanted which made it ‘not your average shoot’. This ranged from strange green screen cut aways to wide shots that lingered uncomfortably for far too long. Foxy are a band that want to do performance videos primarily over anything else as that is very much in their make up. Their performance is part of the overall band personality so this was our starting angle before we’d even hit the studio. Please check out some of the photos above and if you have any specific questions please drop them into my inbox.

Rx

"And that is the terrible and secret fate of all life. You’re trapped; in a nightmare you keep waking up into."
ZoomInfo
Camera

Nikon D700

ISO

1600

Aperture

f/3.2

Exposure

1/200th

Focal Length

135mm

"And that is the terrible and secret fate of all life. You’re trapped; in a nightmare you keep waking up into."

My next release, heading out all over the world in a couple weeks. Did you grab a copy?

What up Leeds. The last show for my new homies in @citizentheband. I’m gonna miss doing Hagrid and Jesse Pinkman impressions.